Thy Will (Not Mine) Be Done


Sally's Serenity Spot

I love this song! I just lost the “love of my life” on Sunday, Feb. 4, 2018, and I am consoled because of my faith, and because he is no longer suffering. I have learned through thirty years of recovery that God’s will is better for me than my own. Hillary Scott’s lovely music has run through my head continually since then. In our Big Book, it mentions “Thy Will (Not Mine) Be Done”.  I have been hearing in my head all month long “Thy Will Be Done”.  I have picked it as the theme of our 68th. anniversary this year.  I will be chairing our meeting for the first time ever. I am honored to be asked. My sponsor was the first woman that helped to build this group. 
 “Every day is a day we must carry a vision of God’s will into all of our activities. How can…

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My Husband, the Love of my Life, Leonard Ross Tudor, Texas


Sally Frederick Tudor & Leonard Ross Tudor, March 26, 2009, Cheddars, League City, TX

Sally and Leonard Tudor, Graduation dinner @ Cheddar’s in League City, Texas, 26 March 2009 (my favorite pic of us)

Sally & Leonard Tudor & Jean Mancill-March 26, 2009

Sally and Leonard Tudor, and Jean Linderman Frederick Mancill @ Sally’s Graduation from ITT Technical Institute-Webster, dinner @ Cheddar’s in League City, Texas, 26 March 2009

Birth:  Jun. 7, 1956
Dublin
Erath County
Texas, USA
Death:  Feb. 4, 2018
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA
The “Love of my Life”. Len passed away this morning at home, Houston, Harris, Texas. Len suffered with C.H.F. and Diabetes for years. He was a real fighter for over 61 years. Len and me survived Hurricane Harvey together. He did not become bedridden until November 1, 2017 after a long hard battle with his congestive heart failure.

His heart was already failing with his C.H.F. before Hurricane Harvey, and then they had no bed for him in any hospital! He suffered and bled for three days with infected and oozing sores on his legs and foot, sleeping in his flooded wheelchair at the George Brown Convention Center until they finally had a bed for him at Ben Taub Hospital. Len had to go back and forth to hospitals many times after the hurricane due to his injuries, his Diabetes and his Congestive Heart Failure. We survived three months in a hotel paid for by FEMA until our home could be repaired. 

Leonard Tudor & my clock he made me, 2007

Leonard’s clock that he made me for my birthday in Jan. 2oo7

Len loved his family, woodworking,  wood carving, and fishing with his family. He made many things for me and our home.

Leonard Tudor-Video 4.jpg

Len playing guitar and singing to me in 2008

He loved singing and playing his guitar for me and others. He was good with his hands, and he hated it when his diseases progressed so much that he could not use his hands to carve anymore. 

Crystal Beach

Leonard Tudor and Karl Frederick’s shark that he caught on Crystal Beach, Texas

God answered our prayers, and he was able to come home and spend his last Christmas with me and Baby. He passed away at home like he had wanted to on Sunday, February 4, 2018. 

Sally and Leonard Tudor Jan. 27, 2006
Our Wedding Day!

Married: 27 January 2006 in Harmony Wedding Chapel, Houston, Harris, Texas. He leaves the “Love of his Life” his wife, Sally Ann Frederick Tudor, of Houston, Harris, Texas, and his Baby dog “BooBoo”.  Our puppy was our baby. We had no children. Len had one step son, Jason Fallin of Houston, Harris, Texas.

cowboy love

This is not us of course, but it was one of my favorite pics and it embodied how Len treated me and made me feel special and loved.

Len was a “good old country boy”, and he loved his family dearly, and cried and told me that he did not want to leave me and Baby. It broke my heart to see him so miserable.  I told him that me and Baby did not want him to leave us either, but we did not want to see him suffer either.  We told each other everyday that we loved each other. We kissed goodnight every night. He has not even been gone twenty four hours yet, and I miss him terribly. I can’t stand to look at his empty room. I am trying to get that image out of my head of him miserable and grasping for air. I understand now why mother never remarried after my step dad died ten years before she did. I don’t ever want to go through that pain again.

We found out today that we cannot afford services, they want 5, 000. to 6, 000. for everything that we want even with the cheapest casket, and the burial lot already paid for. So, my sister is negotiating with the funeral home, to see how cheap we can go with maybe just cremation.

My family is broke they have spent thousands of their own money on fixing our house, so that we could come home. Len was home for Christmas because of them. I have no money! I have the plot already, but that won’t cover any of the other charges. I am in turmoil now. Praying for God to direct me. So, there will be no formal services for him, but we as a family will have a graveside memorial for him instead. We need to come up with the money to have him cremated. Somehow, someway God will provide.

Leonard was a son of Annie Mae (McCann) Tudor and Donald Wayne Tudor of Uvalde, Texas formerly of Stephenville, Erath, Texas. His father preceded him in death. His mother survives him along with his brothers, Steve Anthony Morgan, Donald Raymond Tudor, and sister Anita Corrine (Spurgeon) Tudor. 

 Leonard Tudor, Mineral Wells, TX-June 2008

Len hamming it up on our trip to Mineral Wells, Texas to visit friends, Belinda Reeves and Deryl Anderson, 2008. He loved his ham radios.

Burial:
Oaklawn Cemetery
Somerville
Burleson County
Texas, USA
 Oaklawn Cemetery, Somerville, TX,
Created by: Texas Tudors
Record added: Feb 04, 2018
Find A Grave Memorial# 187099255

 

Leonard Ross Tudor’s~52nd. Birthday~June 2008~Home


Leonard Ross Tudor, Crystal City, TX, 1st. grade
Len in 1st. grade at Crystal City, Texas, 1962-1963.

Born on 7 June 1956 in Dublin, Erath County, Texas.

Son of Donald Wayne Tudor & Annie Mae (McCann) Tudor of Uvalde, Texas, formerly Stephenville, Texas.

Leonard wanted to just stay home and be with me. Len grilled a steak for our lunch. I ordered pizza for dinner. It was good. I worked on genealogy. It was a good day. We both get so tired of being on the road all the time! We did what we wanted for a change. Home Sweet Home.

Donald Wayne Tudor and Annie Mae (McCann) Tudor, Stephenville, Erath, Texas



Donald Wayne Tudor & Annie Mae (McCann) Tudor of Uvalde, Texas (formerly of Stephenville, Erath County, Texas. [photo taken November 1982]

Parents of Leonard Ross Tudor, the Grandson of Sol Ross “Conrad” Tudor & Bergie Mae (Mobley) Tudor; and Jesse William McCann & Ella Marie (Gillilan) McCann of Stephenville, Erath, Texas.
Great Grandson of Thomas Benton Tudor & Sallie(Hampton)(Keith) Tudor; and John Bergis “J.B.” Mobley & Mary Elizabeth “Lizzie” (Craig) Mobley of Stephenville, Erath County, Texas; Michael “Mike” Lafette McCann & Matilda Mae (Hancock) McCann of Stephenville, Erath County, Texas; James Franklin Gillilan & Annie Belle (Bishop) Gillilan of Stephenville, Erath, Texas.
Leonard’s wife is Sally Ann (Frederick) Tudor of Houston, Harris County, Texas.

John Tudor, III – Granville, North Carolina & Madison, Kentucky


Texas Tudor's Memorials

Image result for Brunswick Co., VA on Poplar CreekImage result for Brunswick Co., VA on Poplar Creek

John Tudor, III

Birth: Oct. 10, 1754
Brunswick County, Virginia, USA

Image result for Cottonburg, Madison, KentuckyDeath: Jan. 10, 1838
Cottonburg, Madison County, Kentucky, USA

“This cemetery was set aside on the original homestead of John Tudor III. His first wife Martha Searcy is the earliest recorded burial, but there could be earlier lost stones. His 2nd wife Frances Phillips Tudor is also probably buried here.

John was born in Virginia and the Tudor family migrated to North Carolina, and from there John and at least eight siblings came to Kentucky, most staying in Madison county.

John and Martha Searcy Tudor are my 5X great-grandparents. Everyone buried in this cemetery is directly related to John and Martha.

Susannah Tudor Long is the daughter of John and Martha’s son John Hooker Tudor. Sometime after she married Perry Long, the old homestead came to their ownership and most of the burials here are some of their 13…

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Henry Tudor – Brunswick, Virginia


Texas Tudor's Memorials

Image result for brunswick virginiaImage result for brunswick virginia

Henry Tudor

Birth: 1752 

Brunswick, Brunswick, Virginia, American Colonies

Son of John Tudor, Jr. and Elizabeth Seymour Tudor
Married: 
about 1774 in Granville, North Carolina to Nancy Harris
Children:
Kinsey Luther, Sr., Susannah, John, Henry, Joel H., Phebe, Nancy Harris, and Absolum H. Tudor 
Death:
Burial
The Barren River is a 135-mile-long (217 km)[1]river in western Kentucky, United States. It is the largest tributary of the Green River, which drains more of Kentucky than any other river.[citation needed] The Barren River rises in Monroe County and flows into the Green in northeast Warren County.
“WARREN county was formed in 1796, and named in memory of General JOSEPH WARREN, who fell at Bunker Hill. It embraces about five hundred and sixty square miles; and…

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John Tudor, Jr, Greenville, Pitts, North Carolina


Image result for Greenville, North Carolina

Image result for Greenville, North Carolina

John Tudor, Jr. 

Birth: 1720

Isle of Wight, Isle of Wight, Virginia, United States

Image result for Isle of Wight, Isle of Wight, Virginia, United States

Image result for Isle of Wight, Isle of Wight, Virginia, United States

First Marriage: about 1748 Brunswick County, Virginia to Elizabeth Fraser
Second Marriage: about 1761 in Granville County, North Carolina to Elizabeth Seymour White
Third Marriage: before 1764 in Brunswick County, Virginia to Frances Phillips
 
Death
Granville County, North Carolina – Granville County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 59,916. Its county seat is Oxford. source: Wikipedia
Burial: 
Non-Cemetery Burial Created by: Terri T 
Record added: Mar 20, 2016 
Find A Grave Memorial# 159792522

“JOHN TUDOR, SR. b. ca. 1695; d. ca. 1721. (A very young man). Little is known about John Tudor, SR. d. intestate 1771 in Surry Co., VA.. Inventory of his estate was filed under JOHN TEDDER in Surry Co., VA.. He left a widow named Mary and 2 young sons- Benjamin Tudor, and John Tudor, JR.

It is known that the widow Mary m2. to the co-administrator of the estate, Henry Rose, some months prior to the filing of the Inventory 1 Ap. 1721. Proof that he left 2 young sons comes from the Deeds & Estate records of Henry Rose, when he explains the relationship to his wife Mary, and refers to them as step-sons when he deeded land to them. John Tudor, SR. had modest household furnishings, some pewter, a Bible, and a Book of Common Prayer (suggesting a link to the Church of England), and shoemaker’s tools along with a ‘parcel of leather. (suggesting he had been a shoemaker by trade).

JOHN TUDOR JR. was b. ca 1720 ; d. 1782 Granville Co., N. C.. It is highly probable that he was born in VA.. He was born no later than 1720 and could have been born a few years earlier. It is believed that he spent his ‘growing up’ years in the Isle of Wight Co., VA.. The first record that we have of John Tudor, JR., is a deed to him from his step-father, Henry Rose, in Brunswick Vo., VA., dated 7 June, 1750, which states that both men were living in Brunswick Vo., VA.. Henry Rose deeded the remainder of the 342 acre tract of land in Brunswick Co., VA., but reserved interest for himself and his wife, Mary, to reside on the tract. Henry Rose died about 1752 and John Tudor, JR., remained in Brunswick Co., VA., until 1764, when he moved to Granville Co., N.C., with his own family and other TUDOR relatives. John Tudor, JR. m 1st Elizabeth [nee ???] 1749-69. There is no evidence to tell us what her maiden name was. There is evidence that she died before 1762. . and John Tudor, JR., married another Elizabeth. There is evidence that she was a daughter of Valentine White, and OUR TUDOR LINE traces to this Elizabeth. The 2nd Elizabeth was the mother of BLUMER TUDOR, our ancestor.

The children of John Tudor, JR., were: A. Phoebe Tudor, b, ca, 1750; m. John Morris. B. Henry Tudor, b. ca. 1752; d. by 1782; m. Nancy, C. John Tudor III, b. 1754, had a R/W pension. A R/W soldier who went to Madison Co., KY..

He m. 1st 1779 in Granville Co., N.C.; to Martha Search. He m. 2nd to Frances Phillips, m 3rd to Elizabeth White. These were the children of his 1st wife.

Children of his 2nd wife were: D. Valentine Tudor, b. 1764; m. Granville Co., N.C., to Elizabeth Hicks. Valentine Tudor had a R/W pension. E. Tabitha Tudor, b. 1766, m. 1784 Granville Co., N.C., to Pleasant Whitlow. F. Winefred Tudor, b. ca. 1769; m. James Long. G. BLUMER TUDOR, (our ancestor), b. 1770-72 Granville Co., N.C.; m. 21 May, 1795 in Madison Co., KY. to CHARITY TURNER. (more later). H. Daniel Tudor, b. 1774; m. Nancy Moberly. I. Anne Tudor, b. ca. 1777, m. Samuel Moberly.

Image result for madison county kentucky

Madison County, Kentucky

During the migration in 1785-1787, the widow Elizabeth took her 6 youngest children to Madison Co., KY., with her eldest son Valentine & his family. There is evidence that some of her older children joined her there. She died in Madison Co., KY., amongst her children.”

source: 9 September 2015 by ColeScottCameron1

Image result for Greenville, North Carolina

John Tudor, Sr, Denbigh, Clwyd, Wales


denbighshire-denbigh-crown-square-c1950s

denbigh-wales_castle

John Tudor, Sr.

Born: 1684 in Denbigh, Clwyd, Wales, United Kingdom.

Died: 1721 in Surry County, Virginia.

Image resultImage result for Surry Co., VA

Eastover Manor House on the James- 1800’s Plantation Home

Image result for surry, virginia history

Married: 1717 to Mary Seat (aka Seate) in Isle of Wight, Virginia.

Children: John Jr. and Benjamin Tudor. 

Image result for isle of wight virginia history

Surry County, Virginia is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Its county seat is Surry. In 1652, Surry County was formed from the portion of James City County south of the James River.Wikipedia

Image result for Surry Co., VA

“JOHN TUDOR, SR. b. ca. 1695; d. ca. 1721. (A very young man). Little is known about John Tudor, SR. d. intestate 1771 in Surry Co., VA.. Inventory of his estate was filed under JOHN TEDDER in Surry Co., VA.. He left a widow named Mary and 2 young sons- Benjamin Tudor, and John Tudor, Jr. It is known that the widow Mary m2. to the co-administrator of the estate, Henry Rose, some months prior to the filing of the Inventory 1 Ap. 1721. Proof that he left 2 young sons comes from the Deeds & Estate records of Henry Rose, when he explains the relationship to his wife Mary, and refers to them as step-sons when he deeded land to them. John Tudor, SR. had modest household furnishings, some pewter, a Bible, and a Book of Common Prayer (suggesting a link to the Church of England), and shoemaker’s tools along with a ‘parcel of leather. (suggesting he had been a shoemaker by trade).

JOHN TUDOR JR. was b. ca 1720 ; d. 1782 Granville Co., N. C.. It is highly probable that he was born in VA.. He was born no later than 1720 and could have been born a few years earlier. It is believed that he spent his ‘growing up’ years in the Isle of Wight Co., VA. The first record that we have of John Tudor, JR., is a deed to him from his step-father, Henry Rose, in Brunswick, VA, dated 7 June, 1750, which states that both men were living in Brunswick, VA. 

Henry Rose deeded the remainder of the 342 acre tract of land in Brunswick, VA. but reserved interest for himself and his wife, Mary, to reside on the tract. Henry Rose died about 1752 and John Tudor, JR., remained in Brunswick Co., VA., until 1764, when he moved to Granville Co., N.C., with his own family and other TUDOR relatives. John Tudor, JR. m 1st Elizabeth [nee ???] 1749-69. There is no evidence to tell us what her maiden name was. There is evidence that she died before 1762. . and John Tudor, JR., married another Elizabeth Seymour White. There is evidence that she was a daughter of Valentine White, and OUR TUDOR LINE traces to this Elizabeth. The 2nd Elizabeth was the mother of BLUMER TUDOR, our ancestor.

The children of John Tudor, JR., were: A. Phoebe Tudor, b, ca, 1750; m. John Morris. B. Henry Tudor, b. ca. 1752; d. by 1782; m. Nancy, C. John Tudor III, b. 1754, had a R/W pension. A R/W soldier who went to Madison Co., KY..

He m. 1st 1779 in Granville, N.C.; to Martha Search. He m. 2nd to Frances Phillips, m 3rd to Elizabeth White. These were the children of his 1st wife.

Children of his 2nd wife were: D. Valentine Tudor, b. 1764; m. Granville Co., N.C., to Elizabeth Hicks. Valentine Tudor had a R/W pension. E. Tabitha Tudor, b. 1766, m. 1784 Granville Co., N.C., to Pleasant Whitlow. F. Winifred Tudor, b. ca. 1769; m. James Long. G. BLUMER TUDOR, (our ancestor), b. 1770-72 Granville Co., N.C.; m. 21 May, 1795 in Madison Co., KY. to CHARITY TURNER. (more later). H. Daniel Tudor, b. 1774; m. Nancy Moberly. I. Anne Tudor, b. ca. 1777, m. Samuel Moberly. During the migration in 1785-1787, the widow Elizabeth took her 6 youngest children to Madison Co., KY., with her eldest son Valentine & his family. There is evidence that some of her older children joined her there. She died in Madison Co., KY., amongst her children.”

source: 9 September 2015 by ColeScottCameron1, FamilySearch.org Website

Alternate date and place of birth 1692 in Surry County, Virginia.

Death: 1721 in Surrey Co., Virginia

Event: Inventory of Estate Misc 1 APR 1721

Note:

Administrators of estate were Henry Rose and his wife Mary

Household furnishings, some pewter, a Bible, a Book of Common Prayer, shoemaker tools, a parcel of leather.

Surry Co., Virginia

Burial: Probably Surry County, Virginia

Event: Surname Variant John Tedder

Note:

Gerald R. Tudor Genealogical Research

We first learn about John Tedder, later known as Tudor, in Surry Co., VA, where his inventory was returned in 1721. Surry was formed from James City County in 1652. From existing maps, the county seemed to have no western boundary as the northern and southern boundaries ran from a northeasterly to southwesterly direction. Since it is believed that John was a relatively young man and father at the time he died, considering that his widow died in 1781, he could have been born in Surry, Isle of Wight, Warwick, James City, or other close by counties in existence in this early period. Or, John could have been an immigrant. Nothing more is known as of 2001 (date recorded by G.R.Tudor in his research) that would hint of a day in his life prior to 1721 except for two young sons, both of whom could have been born prior to 1 April 1721 or one no later than December or January the following. Data for this John Tudor is skimpy but circumstantially sufficient to be our earliest known ancestor. One Family Tree suggest that this John is the son of a Richard Tudor, born in Wales. There is some evidence that a Richard Tudor, wife and son came to the colonies and settled in Isle of Wight County, Virginia in the late 1600’s. Other than this statement, there is absolutely no proof, and further, the name Richard is not repeated in the near known generations to this recorder’s knowledge. So any reader should take this “with a grain of salt.” There were earlier Tudors in this tide-water area also, but no connections have been made. Thanks to the research of several individuals over a long period of time, namely Terrilyn P. Litvan (primary and secondary sources in research done for David F. Tudor of Indiana), Christine Rose (The Rose Family Association records revealing the connection: Henry Rose & Mary, his wife, mother of Benjamin and John Tudor), the late Mrs. Terry (Maude Eloise Bridges) Coats of Texas (research toward a published book), Marlen Mays (no direct contact, but her work most liekly part of some of the others cited here), Michael S. Tudor of Louisiana, Mrs. Robert (Dolores) Rutherford of California (extensive compilation from primary and secondary sources), and the work of the late Mrs. Marjorie Rowley Judkins, whose work was submitted to LDS and is currently being edited for up-date with known corrections, by her brother. The very first Tudor of our local family that was known to have ventured into the family’s history, began with Civil War veteran Jason Tudor in 1907 when he requested the military history of his grandfather, John Tudor. His daughter Margaret followed up years later with additional queries into the family’s heritage. H. Thomas Tudor of Kentucky, some early records, but misleading in some respects due to not having the resources now available, but important in respect to being one of the earlier published accounts of the Tudor family into Madison Co., KY when a short biography was done in conjunction with the dedication of a D.A.R. marker for John Tudor who settled in 1785 in what became Madison Co., in 1786.

In 2000, Mr. William Henthorn of OK, has shared his extensive compilation and notes on the Tudor/Sallee families, which is being added to this data base. Most of the above have concentrated on their particular descent lines with the exception of Litvan. This compiler has had an interest in all Tudor lines in an attempt to at least present as many arms of this family as can be compiled. The subject of these notes, John Tedder, was deceased before 1 April 1721, when the inventory of his estate was filed in Surry Co., VA. Administrators of John’s inventory were a Henry Rose and his wife Mary. Later data proves that this Mary, wife of Henry Rose, had two sons, Benjamin and John Tudor. Henry Rose stats on two occasions transfers land to both of Mary’s sons, and in the case of John, states that he is the son of Mary his wife. ( see notes for John Tudor, son of this John). The inventory of John Sr. shows that he owned modest household furnishings, some pewter, a Bible, and a Book of Common Prayer, shoemaker tools and a parcel of leather. While Henry and Mary Rose with Mary’s sons Benjamin and John lived in Isle of Wight Co., VA, the land that was deeded tot he sons was in Brunswick Co., VA where the family later resided. The Brunswick property was on the waters of the Poplar Creek which was on the southwestern border of the county. No records have been found in Isle of Wight Co., itself for this Rose and step-sons.

Marriage 1 Mary SEAT

Children:

Benjamin TUDOR b: ABT 1718 in Virginia

John TUDOR b: ABT 1720 in Isle of Wight Co., VA

Sources:

Title: Genealogical Research of Gerald R Tudor Text: familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/t/u/d/Gerald-R-Tudor/GENE8-0001.html

 

 

 

 

Jesse Gee Tudor


Jesse Gee Tudor

Birth: 1811
Barren County
Kentucky, USA

HERITAGE NOT HATE LICENSE TAGS
Death: Nov. 30, 1863

Bald Knob, Tippah County
Mississippi, USA 

He was named after his maternal Grandmother Winifred Gee.

Married Elizabeth Jane “Betsy” (Boone) Cutbirth on 19 June 1833 in Hardeman County, Tennessee.

Jesse & Betsy had fifteen children together:
Elizabeth “Eliza” Jane (Garrett), William Duncan “W.D.”, John Glaze “J.G”, Martha Gee (Patton), Thomas Benton “T.B.”, Tilmon Woodard “T.W.”, Mary Elizabeth “M. E.”, Daniel Kinsey, Hardy Strickland “H.S.”, I. F., Julia Frances “J.F.” (Hopkins), Jesse Benjamin “J.B.”, Melissa Ann (Taylor), James Buchanan, and Robert Sanford “R.S.” Bowers Tudor.

He was a Confederate soldier in the 7th.Cavalry, Co. H, in the Civil War in Tippah County, Mississippi.

He died on 30 November 1863 at Bald Knob Hill, Tippah County, Mississippi. Exact location of burial is unknown. 

His parents were: (K.L.) Kinsey Luther Tudor and Winifred “Winnie” (Gee) Tudor.

His grandparents were: Henry Tudor and Nancy (Harris) Tudor of Brunswick County, Virginia.

Family links: 
Parents:
Kinsey Luther Tudor (1775 – 1811)
Winifred Gee Tudor (1780 – 1848)

Spouse:
Elizabeth “Eliza” Jane Boone Cutbirth Tudor (1815 – 1897)

Children:
Elizabeth Jane Tudor Garrett (1834 – 1906)
William Duncan Tudor (1836 – 1865)
Martha Gee Tudor Patton (1839 – 1876)
Tilmon Woodard Tudor (1841 – 1916)
Thomas Benton Tudor (1842 – 1917)
Robert Sanford Bower Tudor (1859 – 1943)

Burial: Bald Knob Hill, Tippah County, Mississippi
Body lost or destroyed
Specifically: Confederate soldier 
killed during Civil War

J. Tudor (First_Last)
Regiment Name 7 Mississippi Cavalry.
Side Confederate
Company  H
Soldier’s Rank_In  Private
Soldier’s Rank_Out  Private
Alternate Name  J./Tuter
Notes
Film Number M232 roll 41

Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: May 28, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 90857009

Elizabeth “Eliza” Jane “Betsy” Boone (Cutbirth) Tudor


 

 

Arch Bridge over Silver Creek Maury County Tennessee (Charles Martin Bridge) Arch Bridge, Maury County Courthouse

Arch Bridge over Silver Creek Maury County Tennessee (Charles Martin Bridge) Arch Bridge, Maury County Courthouse

Birth: 1815

Maury County
Tennessee, USA

Death: Oct. 21, 1897
Erath County
Texas, USA

Grace Episcopal Church in Maury County, Tennessee

Grace Episcopal Church in Maury County, Tennessee

Married Jesse Gee Tudor on 19 June 1833 in Hardeman County, Tennessee.

Jesse & Betsy had fifteen children together:

Elizabeth “Eliza” Jane (Garrett), William Duncan “W.D.”, Elizabeth (Rowland), John Glaze “J.G”, Martha Gee (Patton), Thomas Benton “T.B.”, Tilman Woodard “T.W.”, Mary Elizabeth “M. E.”, Daniel Kinsey, Hardy Strickland “H.S.”, I. F., Julia Frances “J.F.” (Hopkins), Jesse Benjamin “J.B.”, Melissa Ann (Taylor), James Buchanan, Tilghman N, and Robert Sanford “R.S.” Bowers Tudor.

Family links:
Spouse:
Jesse Gee Tudor (1811 – 1863)

Children:
Elizabeth Jane Tudor Garrett (1834 – 1906)
William Duncan Tudor (1836 – 1865)
Martha Gee Tudor Patton (1839 – 1876)
Tilmon Woodard Tudor (1841 – 1916)
Thomas Benton Tudor (1842 – 1917)
Robert Sanford Bower Tudor (1859 – 1943)

Inscription:
“Wife of Jessie G. Tudor / Aged 82 Years”

Burial:
Ramsey Cemetery
Stephenville
Erath County
Texas, USA

Created by: Ken Jones
Record added: Sep 08, 2006
Find A Grave Memorial# 15668912

 

My Family Research


FAMILY - ROOTS

I have already made my wishes clear to my family in case I die before them, that I want a copy of my thirty years of research to be donated to Clayton Genealogical in Houston, Texas, and a copy also to the George Memorial Library in Richmond, Texas.

My ultimate goal all along has been to write a book about my families, but I had to revise that plan to write several books on each branch of my family. I have too much for one book, and not all of my family will care about the other branches of our family as I have been. I love all history, not just family history, and not just my families history. 

I had a dream years ago about me dying and people just throwing things away, because they meant nothing to them.

Well, it means a hell of a lot to me. My son promised to handle according to my wishes. I have gathered and transcribed thousands of people’s data. The more I thought about it, I was so grateful that I had already transcribed all of the information from the records that I have in my possession.

Some of my many resources were:

  1. My maternal grandfather, Harry William Linderman, and great grandfather, Edward Francis Linderman’s family records and pictures.
  2. My maternal great aunt Gladys Serena Linderman Nelson provided me with information and pictures on the Linderman and Nelson families.
  3. The Palen Pedigree Chart that I received from my mother, Jean Marie Linderman Frederick Mancill, that she received in 1970 from Virginia Palen Long, her cousin, that were compiled by Vernon Walser Palen in 1965.
  4. My paternal grandmother, Elizabeth Annie “Bessie” Mazac Frederick’s Family Reunion notebook, that I transcribed all records from, The handwritten Mazac Family Reunion notebook that I received in 1995 from my Mazac Ancestors. I was the 1995-1998 President of the Mazac Reunion held in Circleville, Williamson County, Texas. The notebook has been damaged through a flood in 2001 in Houston, Harris County, Texas, from Tropical Storm Allison, but I salvaged it and still have it in 2016 as of this writing. 
  5. My paternal aunt, Agnes Rainie Frederick Christ, provided me with many old photos of the Czech-Moravian families on our tree.
  6. My paternal Czech-Moravian cousin, Louis Joseph Havelka’s records, recieved from his wife, Bernice Cernosek Havelka through verbal conversations with in 1995 provided information on the Havelka family.
  7. The FamilySearch.org and Findagrave.com websites have helped me immensely. 
  8. My mother-in-law, Annie Mae McCann Tudor, provided me with photos and information on the McCann and the Tudor families.
  9. My maternal second cousin, Roy Leonard Nelson, Jr. gave me information on the Nelson families. 

There are many more sources but these are the ones that were on the top of my list. I will add more later as time allows. 

God Bless Texas


NOT TEXAS - TEXAS

It was back in 490 BC when tyranny stood before liberty at a place called Thermopylae and Xerxes and the invading Persians demanded King Leonidas and the Spartans to lay down their arms. Leonidas replied with the words, “Molon Labe.”

On November 25, 1778 , 127 Continental Soldiers and some militiamen totaling about 200, under the command of Colonel John McIntosh, stood defiantly before a British force in Georgia at Ft. Morris and responded to the request of surrender to the British commander Colonel Fuser with “come and take it.”

On October 2, 1835 Mexico’s military commander of Texas, Colonel Domingo de Ugartechea, dispatched a company of Dragoons to retrieve the cannon from the Texians at the town of Gonzales.

Upon demanding surrender of the cannon, the Texians responded, “come and take it” – they voted to fight and deployed 140 to drive off the Mexicans.

The words of Leonidas translate to “Come, Take.” Those words are part of the American fabric and our desire to be free and independent when we are faced by tyranny. God bless Texas y’all!”

source: Allen West

All of our Ancestors Emigrated To America Legally


LEGAL IMMIGRANTS

All of our ancestors emigrated to America legally, worked for what they wanted, and never took welfare. Beautiful America = Krasna Amerika.

The TUDOR’s emigrated from England and Wales.

The MCCANN’s emigrated from Ireland.

My FREDERICK and MAZAC’s emigrated from Moravia.

My LUND’s emigrated from Norway.

My OLSSON’s emigrated from Sweden.

My HANSSON’s emigrated from Sweden.

My HAMMELL’s emigrated from Scotland.

My HARRIS’s emigrated from England

My HAMMOND’s emigrated from England.

My LINDERMAN ancestors emigrated from Germany, and resided in Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1740. They helped to form these United States.

I still cannot fathom why so many millions of people immigrate to America to escape Communism and for freedom, yet they attempt to change America into the third world hell hole that they crawled out of!

My LINDERMAN ancestors came legally, worked for what they wanted, and did not accept charity. They did not expect others to feed, or clothe them or their families. They helped to build this grand Republic of ours. They served in our military in every war.

I will honor their work and sacrifices by standing up for and speaking out against the Communist N.W.O. takeover of our great nation. God, please help us to save America. 

Family is Forever


SALLY TUDOR, REBECCA FLOYD, PHYLLIS HYDEN

Family is Forever! God blessed me with a wonderful, loving family, and we were blessed with the opportunity to get together for the holidays. Me, Sally Tudor, my cousin, Rebecca Floyd, and my sister, Phyllis Hyden, and my wonderful brother-in-law, James Hyden, all enjoyed food and fellowship at Pappasitos in Houston, Harris, Texas in December 2015. 

The Southern Flag is about Heritage Not Hate


Frederick Family Genealogy

HERITAGE NOT HATE LICENSE TAGS

The Southern Flag is about Heritage Not Hate!

My Frederick ancestors fought in Louisiana, my husband’s McCann and Mobley ancestors fought in Arkansas, my Dad’s ancestors fought in Alabama, and my husband’s Tudor ancestors fought in Tippah County, Mississippi, and Tennessee, his Craig ancestors fought in Virginia, and his Hancock ancestors fought in Texas.

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We Are The Chosen


"Remember and honor family who have come and gone before you, because they had a hand in shaping who you are." Genealogy Quote

“Remember and honor family who have come and gone before you, because they had a hand in shaping who you are.”

*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+* 
We are the chosen. In each family, there is one who seems called to find the ancestors.

To put flesh on their bones and make them live again, to tell the family story and to feel that somehow they know and approve.

Doing genealogy is not a cold gathering of facts, but instead, breathing life into all who have gone before.

We are the storytellers of the tribe.

Author Unknown 
*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+* 

†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††  
Lord, help me dig into the past
And sift the sands of time,
That I might find the roots that made
This family tree of mine.
Lord, help me trace the ancient roads
On which my father’s trod,
And led them through so many lands
To find our present sod.
Lord, help me find an ancient book
Or dusty manuscript,
That’s safely hidden now away
In some forgotten crypt.
Lord, let it bridge the gap that haunts
My soul when I can’t find,
The missing link between some name
That ends the same as mine.
Author Unknown 
†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††  

Sallie Hampton Keith Tudor-Tippah County, Mississippi


Texas Tudor's Memorials

sallie hampton keith tudor, 1861 Sallie Hampton Keith Tudor, age 16, 1861, Tippah County, Mississippi. married Thomas Benton Tudor on 20 May 1867 in Tippah County, Mississippi. photo courtesy of Danny Meeks of Tippah, Mississippi.

Sallie Hampton Keith Tudor, age 16, 1861, Tippah County, Mississippi. married Thomas Benton Tudor on 20 May 1867 in Tippah County, Mississippi.
photo courtesy of Danny Meeks of Tippah County, Mississippi, emailed 23 April 2015.

Birth: Sep. 11, 1845

Tippah County
Mississippi, USA

Death: Dec. 17, 1924
Stephenville
Erath County
Texas, USA

“Mother”

Family links:

Parents: Sterling Yancey Keith and Eliza Jane P. Jones

Spouse:
Thomas Benton Tudor (1842 – 1917)

Children:
William Forrest Tudor (1868 – 1911)
Henry Hamilton Tudor (1869 – 1953)
Charles Campbell Tudor (1870 – 1939)
Mary Elizabeth Tudor Cobb (1872 – 1964)
Kelsey Keith Tudor (1876 – 1925)
Annie Newton Tudor Mobley (1878 – 1972)
Daisy E. Tudor Goyette (1880 – 1949)
Alfred Hardeman Tudor…

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Thomas Benton “Tom” Tudor~Southern Heroes


Texas Tudor's Memorials

During the Civil War, Tippah County furnished large numbers of troops and military leadership for the Confederate Army. The 2nd Mississippi fought at Manassas in Virginia in 1861 and the 3rd Mississippi fought at Fort Donelson. The 7th Mississippi was formed and served with General Bedford Forrest. That same year, the courthouse was burned by Federal troops, though many valuable records were preserved and hidden for over two years until the war’s completion. The present day courthouse was built in 1870.

Thomas Benton “Tom” Tudor

Birth:  Feb. 7, 1842 Tippah County, Mississippi
Death: May 19, 1917 Stephenville, Erath County, Texas
Son of Jesse Gee Tudor and Eliza Jane Boone Cutbirth Tudor of Barren County, Kentucky.Grandson of Kinsey Luther “K.L.” Tudor of Kentucky and Winifred “Winnie” Gee Tudor of Virginia.

A Southern Confederate veteran hero of the Civil War in Tippah County, Mississippi.He married Sallie Hampton Keith in May…

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God Bless Texas! God Bless America!


GOD BLESS TEXAS GREATEST COUNTRY IN THE WORLD = TEXAS guadalupe_river_hill_country_texas_usa_2048x1138 Sledge Hammer, a Texas Longhorn living in...North Carolina! Hornspread is just shy of 7 feet TEXAS BLUEBONNETS TEXAS BOOTS TEXAS LONGHORN GRILL TEXAS LONGHORN TEXAS LONGHORN2 TEXAS RANGER MUSEUM TEXAS WINDMILL

Home Sweet Home, Texas. No place that I would rather live than Texas. God, Guns, and Guts!

We will never succumb to the Demon-Rat/Communist PIG’s devious plan to destroy our beloved country “from within”! 

Our ancestors left Europe to Escape this Crap!! Godly Mothers & Fathers

God is our only hope to save our beloved America from the Demon-Rat/Communists/Athiests/Muslimes!! Please, God save America! We have no where to go to from here. We MUST save America from the demons.

Family, Like Branches On A Tree, We Grow in Different Directions, Yet Our Roots Remain As One, Rooted In God And Jesus!


FAMILY - ROOTS

If we are Rooted in God and Jesus we are able to stand the strong winds, and storms of life! God never promised us a “rose garden”.  He promised us that He would be there with us to comfort us and we would never have to be alone again, unless we wanted to be. 

My family has shown me that we can go through anything with God and Jesus by our side. God has carried me through abuse, stalking, unemployment, losing my car, losing my home, and divorce. God never left me. I left Him.

Then, he gave me the “love of my life” when He thought that I was ready. I had to learn to put God number one no matter what….above my family, my husband, and my children…when I lost all and only had God…I found out that He was all that I ever needed. Mother told me that Dr. Lambert told her that, “Sometimes God has to put us on our backs, in order for us to have to look up to Him”. When God is all you have left. God is all you need. 

Kensington Palace Tour


Ty

I went on a tour of Kensington Palace with some of my friends a few days ago. I’ve lived down the street from it for two months, but had never made it inside. It was so neat, nothing like my tours of other historical places. It was very relaxed inside, no bad checks, no metal detectors, nothing roped off. We were able to tour several staterooms and apartments within the palace. There were exhibits about the fashion of the modern royals and about Victoria and Albert, the last ruling monarchs to live in Kensington Palace. I had a blast exploring my “neighbors'” house and learning about all of the history that has happened so close to where I live. And also being under the same roof of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge was pretty cool too! We ended the day with dinner at Damario’s Pizzeria, which is on the…

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When In Wales


Ty

I had quite an adventure this weekend! I went on a trip with my school to Wales to go coasteering, kayaking, and hiking. I was so excited for countryside, fresh air, and a break from the city!

Our train ride to our lodge took almost all of Friday to get to. We arrived just in time for dinner, which was a welcome change from the food from the dining hall back at school. Our homemade mac and cheese and chocolate chip cake was amazing! I could write an entire blog just about the food from this trip, it was amazing.

Saturday morning, we woke up bright and early to begin our first activity. The group I was in was assigned to do the most intimidating activity first. None of us had ever done coasteering, so it was new to everybody. Coasteering is basically climbing on the rocks and boulders along…

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What to do with 4 sunny days in London


it's that little feeling of ... Wanderlust

Yes, no joke! I got four, possibly even five, sunny days IN A ROW in London. My friend wasted no time in telling me how lucky I was. Actually, she said something like *yeah sure, it’s like this all the time! (to me commenting why everyone said London has bad weather) We actually keep telling people the weather is bad so they don’t come and we get to enjoy this all by ourselves.* I think there may have been a slight hint of sarcasm there… 😉

Jokes aside, I was thrilled I got to really enjoy London’s outdoors. That first day, as I was standing on the banks of the Thames, looking towards the city and enjoying the sunshine, I was so excited to finally be in Europe! Sure, it was hard to leave the bubble, but the world awaits!! So finally, without further ado, here are my…

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God Bless Texas! God Bless All Our Godly, Good, and Honest Founding Fathers!


English: A statue of Sam Houston in Memorial H...
English: A statue of Sam Houston in Memorial Hermann park, Houston TX (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Sam Houston as a U.S. senator
Sam Houston as a U.S. senator (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Statue of Sam Houston, Huntsville, Texas
Statue of Sam Houston, Huntsville, Texas (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Sam Houston chaired the committee which wrote ...
Sam Houston chaired the committee which wrote a proposed state constitution. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Signer of the Declaration of Independence – Commander-in-Chief of the Texas Army – President of the Republic – Member of Congress of the Republic – Senator in the United States Congress – Governor of Texas

 

His early life–Joins the United States Army–Wounded in the Battle of Horseshoe–Studies Law–Elected Member of Congress and Governor of Tennessee–Came to Texas in 1833–Delegate to Old Washington Convention–Appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Texas Army–Defeats Santa Anna at San Jacinto–Elected President of the Republic–Senator in the United Sates Congress–Governor of Texas–Death in 1863.

 

Sam Houston was born near Lexington, Rockbridge County, Virginia, March 2, 1793.  His ancestors were of Scotch origin.  They came to America about 1689 and settled in Pennsylvania.  Robert Houston, Sam Houston’s grandfather, moved to Virginia and settled Rockbridge County.  Here he reared a family and here Sam Houston was born.  After the death of his father, his mother moved to Blount County, Tennessee.  He was but a lad of thirteen summers when his mother changed her residence from Virginia to the rugged State of Tennessee.  Here he came in contact with the Cherokee Indians, who lived near where his mother settled. He spent many leisure hours with them, joining them in their chase for game, which was in abundance at the time.

In 1813, Mr. Houston enlisted in the United Sates army.  The country was then at war with Great Britain.  He was not in the army long before his peculiar talents for military life were recognized.  He was soon promoted for gallantry in the battle with the Creek Indians.  In a fierce conflict at To-ho-ne-ka, (Horseshoe Bend of the Tallapoosa River), Alabama, he received a painful wound from an arrow from an Indian bow.  General Jackson ordered him to the rear, but he disregarded the order and joined his regiment in the thickest of the battle.  As the battle raged he received another wound that disabled him and from this he did not recover for many months, and did not rejoin his regiment until a short time before peace was declared.  He then served for a short time in the Adjutant General’s office at Nashville.  In November 1819, he was assigned to extra duty as sub-agent among the Cherokee Indians, to carry out a treaty just ratified with the nation.  During the winter of 1819-1820 he conducted a delegation of Cherokee Indians to Washington to present their claims to the Federal Government.

Regarding Houston’s military career in the United States army, a memorandum from the war department shows that “Sam Houston entered the Seventh Infantry as a Sergeant; became ensign in the Thirty-ninth Infantry, July 29, 1813; was severely wounded in the battle of Horse-shoe Bend under Major-General Jackson, March 27th; made Third Lieutenant December1813; promoted to Second Lieutenant May, 1814; retained May 15th in First Infantry; became First Lieutenant March 1, 1818; resigned May 17, 1818.”

Soon after resigning from the army Mr. Houston entered the law office of Mr. James Trimble, an eminent lawyer at Nashville, for the purpose of studying law.  He was soon admitted to the bar and at once became a successful advocate, locating in Lebanon.  He was soon elected District Attorney.  This made it necessary for him to reside in Nashville.  His resident in Lebanon was so pleasant that he left it with regrets.  When about to move to Nashville he delivered a public address to the citizens of Lebanon in which he expressed regrets that it became necessary for him to leave them.  In his address he said: “The time has come when I must bid you farewell.  Although duty calls me away, yet I must confess it is with feelings of sincere regret that I leave you.  I shall ever remember with emotions of gratitude the kindness which I have received at your hands.  I came among you poor and a stranger and you extended the hand of welcome, and received me kindly.  I was naked and ye clothed me–I was hungry and you fed me–I was athirst and ye gave me drink.”

“Mr. Houston’s address” said I. V. Drake, in a letter to his biographer, Dr. William Carey Crane, “was delivered in so pathetic a style that its effect was to cause many to shed tears.”

In 1820 Mr. Houston was appointed Adjutant-General of the State, with the rank of Colonel.  In 1821 he was elected Major-General by the field officers of the division that composed two-thirds of the State.

http://www.texashistorypage.com/Sam_Houston.html

England Travel: Oxford


NJ to the World

If London was a shining beacon of adventure and excitement, relatively Oxford was much more of a disappointment. I think this is true, for me, because I had a explicitly detailed, vivid preconceived notion of what I expected Oxford to be like. Like most college-aged, study abroad, American tourists in Europe, I had to hit one of England’s prestigious schools (those being Cambridge or Oxford: Oxbridge). I happened to choose Oxford, mainly because it’s one of the oldest and highest ranked universities in the world, partially because they filmed bits of Harry Potter there. Needless to say, it did not match what I had expected. But, if Oxford was not good for anything else, it was good for one thing: it got me out of London to see some of the rest of the country of England. I really wish I could have seen more of the English countryside. But Oxford…

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England Travel: London


NJ to the World

While many of my trips in Europe brought me to some of the world’s finest cities, I think it is fair to say that London was the most impressive. Maybe it was because my expectations were not set extremely high (I had been told for some time that London was essentially “New York, but everything is double the price because of the pound system”). While London and New York City share many commonalities– both are bustling metropolises and world leaders in finance– I found there was much about London that made it incredibly distinctive. London is full of history and culture that are unique to the city and the country of England. The red Double-Decker buses, the iconic red phone booths, the street performers, and London’s deep-rooted history were all something of a wonder. Not to mention, the city possessed one of the best transportation systems I have ever experienced…

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STEPHENVILLE, ERATH COUNTY, TEXAS


 Bosque River in Stephenville, TX 

My husband’s ancestors Thomas “Tom” Benton Tudor and Sallie Hampton Keith family moved from Tippah County, Mississippi to Stephenville, Erath County, Texas in 1886. They had  thirteen (13) children together. 





Bridge – Erath Co., TX
In 1891, Texas bridge builder William Flinn assembled this highly unusual cable-stayed bridge using iron pipes, rods and castings. Wrapped wire cables complete the 140-foot invention. 
Crossing the Paluxy River near rural Bluff Dale, this technological wonder remains as the earliest known cable-stayed bridge in the United States.
Photo by:  Todd Ashby, Texas Department of Transportation.

What I Like About Texas (HD)


Uploaded on May 15, 2010 Song What I Like About Texas. Artist Gary P. Nunn. Pictures are from Google. I don’t own the song or music. Watch in HD. Please Comment & Rate Interesting facts about Texas 1. Beaumont to El Paso : 742 miles 2. Beaumont to Chicago : 770 miles 3. El Paso is closer to California than to Dallas 4. World’s first rodeo was in Pecos , July 4, 1883. 5. The Flagship Hotel in Galveston is the only hotel in North America built over water. (Destroyed by Hurricane Ike 2008!) 6. The Heisman Trophy was named after John William Heisman who was the first full-time coach at Rice University in Houston. 7. Brazoria County has more species of birds than any other area in North America 8. Aransas Wildlife Refuge is the winter home of North America ‘s only remaining flock of whooping cranes. 9. Jalapeno jelly originated in Lake Jackson in 1978. 10. The worst natural disaster in U.S…. history was in 1900, caused by a hurricane, in which over 8,000 lives were lost on Galveston Island. 11. The first word spoken from the moon, July 20,1969, was ” Houston ,” but the space center was actually in Clear Lake City at the time. 12. King Ranch in South Texas is larger than Rhode Island. 13. Tropical Storm Claudette brought a U.S. rainfall record of 43’ in 24 hours in and around Alvin in July of 1979. 14. Texas is the only state to enter the U.S. by TREATY, (known as the Constitution of 1845 by the Republic of Texas to enter the Union ) instead of by annexation. This allows the Texas Flag to fly at the same height as the U.S. Flag, and may divide into 5 states. 15. A Live Oak tree near Fulton is estimated to be 1500 years old. 16. Caddo Lake is the only natural lake in the state. 17. Dr Pepper was invented in Waco in 1885. There is no period in Dr Pepper. 18. Texas has had six capital cities: Washington -on- the Brazos, Harrisburg , Galveston, Velasco, West Columbia and Austin. 19. The Capitol Dome in Austin is the only dome in the U.S. which is taller than the Capitol Building in Washington DC (by 7 feet). 20. The San Jacinto Monument is the tallest free standing monument in the world and it is taller than the Washington monument. 21. The name ‘ Texas ‘ comes from the Hasini Indian word ‘tejas’ meaning friends. Tejas is not Spanish for Texas. 22. The State Mascot is the Armadillo (an interesting bit of trivia about the armadillo is they always have four babies. They have one egg, which splits into four, and they either have four males or four females.) 23. The first domed stadium in the U.S. was the Astrodome in Houston.

GAY HILL, WASHINGTON COUNTY, TEXAS


GAY HILL, WASHINGTON COUNTY, TEXAS
TOWN: Gay Hill
COUNTY: Washington
LOCATION: The town is located about
nine miles NE of Brenham off of FM 390
that intersects with Highway 36.
FAMILY HISTORY: THE LINDERMAN’S OWNED THE “WISE ACRE” RANCH IT WAS 120 ACRES, 9 MILES FROM BRENHAM, TEXAS IN GAYHILL, TEXAS.  
My maternal grandparents, Harry and Phyllis (Palen) LINDERMAN, owned a ranch, “Wise Acres” and the “Saturday’s Tavern” there in Gayhill during the 1950’s. Harry and Phyl’s daughters and son-in-laws spent many a fun weekend there with them. I was born near there in Brenham in 1954. Yvonne Burgess, Ken and; Billie Jackson, Jean and; Leroy Frederick, and Patsy and; J.E. Cooke. 



Served at Gay Hill pre 1911. From 1911 – 1953 it served as a school for Afro-Americans in the Mound Hill District. It was moved to Independence by the Independence Historical Society.



Gay Hill


Friedens United Church of Christ
Courtesy Mike Woodfin

Gay Hill
Courtesy Mike Woodfin

Gay Hill
Courtesy Mike Woodfin

Gay Hill House
Courtesy Danielle Moore

GAY HILL, TEXAS (Washington County). Gay Hill is on Farm Road 390 twelve miles northwest of Brenham in the rolling hills of northern Washington County. The town was an educational and religious center on the La Bahía Road in early Texas. Rev. Hugh Wilson established the second Presbyterian church in Texas there in 1839. Presbyterians from throughout the republic met in the community, then known as Chriesman Settlement, to organize the Brazos Presbytery in 1840.

By 1840 the Republic of Texas established a post office in the new town under the name Gay Hill, after the owners of the town store, Thomas Gay and William Carroll Jackson Hill.

The beautiful forested hills and healthy climate attracted prominent early Texans, including residents Horatio Chriesman, R. E. B. Baylor, John Sayles, and Dr. George C. Red. Horticulturist Thomas Affleck‘s Glenblythe Plantation was located in the Gay Hill vicinity.

Old Gay Hill served as the supply point of a moderately prosperous agricultural area. In 1854 a Masonic lodge was founded there. Between 1853 and 1888 Rev. James W. Miller operated Live Oak Female Seminary in Gay Hill. By 1860 the town had flour and lumber mills and a population of 280.

After the Civil War a cotton gin augmented the town’s prosperity; retail establishments continued to thrive. The Masonic lodge and Presbyterian and Baptist churches were active.

During the 1870’s the town had a Grange and a Democratic Club. The Republican party remained strong among Gay Hill’s black residents, despite Greenback party efforts.

When the Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe Railway extended to the Gay Hill vicinity in 1881, residents moved the town to its present location, two miles west of the original site. The former location is sometimes called Old Gay Hill.

Gay Hill’s population was 120 in 1890.

By 1900 Germans were the dominant ethnic group. The town became a distribution center by the early twentieth century. Cotton buying and ginning sustained this station on the Santa Fe through the Great Depression.

By 1936 Gay Hill had an estimated population of 250 and ten businesses. The nearby Sun oilfield, which opened in 1928, and its pipeline enabled the town to maintain a variety of retail and commercial establishments through the early post-World War II era.

The decline of cotton and rise of ranching in the area hastened the town’s demise as a distribution center and supply point. The population declined to 200 by 1958, and businesses decreased to five. The last store closed in 1971, when many residents had moved to Brenham.

In 1993 the estimated population was 145, and the community had no businesses; its economy depended on ranching. It had two churches, a cemetery, and lodge hall. The population remained the same in 2000.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Mrs. R. E. Pennington, History of Brenham and Washington County (Houston, 1915). Charles F. Schmidt,History of Washington County (San Antonio: Naylor, 1949). Vertical Files, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin. Washington County Scrapbook, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin.

http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hlg11 

source: Carole E. Christian

The Age of Innocence


Sally Ann Frederick, age 6 months, June 1954

The picture is adorable. I was a really, sweet, loving, adorable, and kind little girl. I loved everyone, and believed that if everyone would just “be nice” to each other then life would be wonderful. I was an idealist.

But…that was not reality…and everyone was not nice. I was taught that we were all God’s children and we were loved. I thought that the “good guys” always won, and that you should be honest, kind, and loving to everyone.

I loved to read, and I lived through my books. I always had a diary or journal. Writing always gave me a release and helped me to sort my feelings out. 

I loved playing house, dancing, singing, walking barefoot in the cool grass, and climbing trees. Every summer we had a pool in our backyard, and Daddy cooked a lot of barbecue. He made the best chicken with his homemade barbecue sauce, and Mother made potato salad and beans to go with it. Of course, growing up in a German, Norwegian, and Moravian home we always had plenty of good desserts. 

I grew up in Jacinto City, Harris, Texas.

We grew up in a day when you could play outside without fear of being attacked or kidnapped.

We knew all our neighbors and each one of the houses had a lot of children.

We did not have to lock our doors then, because we trusted our neighbors.

We looked out for each other’s homes and children. Mother and Daddy had six of us children.

We celebrated birthdays, and holidays with all our neighbors and family too. There was always good music, good food, and dancing when we celebrated. My Daddy taught me how to dance the polka.

We loved Elvis Presley and Chubby Checker and dancing the Twist. 

We loved playing kick ball, baseball, and chase.

We played “Hide and Seek”.

We played card games, monopoly, dominoes, and yahtzee.

Mother was always home when we came home from school, and Daddy worked hard for a living.

We ate a lot of beans and cornbread, macaroni, and spaghetti. Mother made the best bread.

We did not have much materially, but we had lots of love. Good memories from back then.

My hero-Jean Marie Linderman Frederick Mancill-My Mother

Phyllis and Sally Frederick, 1957, Jacinto City, Harris, Texas

Our European Travel


March 1980, my mother, Jean Marie (Linderman) Frederick Mancill, my step dad, Louis Clifford Mancill, myself Sally (Frederick) Fallin, and Richard Wayne Fallin traveled to England, FranceBelgium, Holland, and Luxembourg together to visit Richard’s brother Jerry Glen Fallin.

He was in the U.S. Navy stationed in Newquay, Cornwall, England. I met my sister-in-law Frances Katherine Aherne-Conroy there.

I thank God that we traveled when we did, because I got a chance to spend a lot of time with my parents before they left me.

My Dad passed away in 2002, and Mother passed away just this past March 9, 2012 in Rosharon, Brazoria County, Texas. They are dearly missed.

You never really get over it, you just learn to accept death as a part of life, and enjoy the time that you have with each other. My only solace is that we are Christians, and I believe that we will meet again one day in heaven where there is no more sorrow, no more pain.

Sol Ross “Conrad” Tudor, Texas


Sol Ross and Leonard Ross Tudor, 1956, Stephenville, TexasStephenville, TX ComancheTexasBankBuilding702

Name: Sol Ross “Conrad” Tudor
Birth: Jul. 5, 1890
Stephenville
Erath County
Texas, USA

Death: Dec. 31, 1968
Stephenville
Erath County
Texas, USA

On double marker with Bergie M. Tudor (1899-1941)
Married Bergie Mae (Mobley) on 6 March 1918 in Erath County, Texas.Resided in Stephenville, Erath County, Texas from 1890-1968.

He was the son of Thomas Benton “T.B.” Tudor and Sallie Hampton (Keith) Tudor of Tippah County, Mississippi.

Sol and Bergie had 4 children together: Leonard Doyle, Raymond Horton, Mae Corrine (Williams), and Donald Wayne Tudor. Sol was a farmer and Bergie was a homemaker.

My husband, Leonard Ross Tudor, was named after his Paternal Grandfather, Sol Ross Tudor, also known as Conrad, and his uncle Leonard.

name: Ross Sol Tudor
event: Draft Registration
event date: 1942
event place: Stephenville, Erath, Texas
gender: Male
birth date: 05 Jul 1890
nara publication title: World War II Draft Cards (4th Registration) for the State of Texas
nara publication number:  
arc identifier: 576252
film number: 4161310
digital folder number: 004161310
image number: 02842
Citing this Record
“United States, World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XP51-G6B : accessed 10 Feb 2013), Ross Sol Tudor, 1942; citing NARA microfilm publications M1939, M1936, and M1937; FHL microfilm 4161310.

1920 Census for Stephenville, Erath County, Texas records: SOL ROSS TUDOR, M, W, AGE 29, MARRIED, TEXAS, FARMER, FATHER BORN IN MISSISSIPPI, MOTHER BORN IN TENNESSEE.

S. ROSS TUDOR, DISTRICT 1, STEPHENVILLE, ERATH COUNTY, TEXAS, AGE 39, BORN IN TEXAS, MARRIED AT 27, WHITE, MALE, PARENTS BOTH BORN IN MISSISSIPPI, CLERK IN HOTEL, OWNED HOME WORTH $1500.

name:S Ross Tudor
event:Census
event date:1930
event place:Stephenville, Erath, Texas
gender:Male
age:39
marital status:Married
race:White
birthplace:Texas
estimated birth year:1891
immigration year:
relationship to head of household:Head
father’s birthplace:Mississippi
mother’s birthplace:Mississippi
enumeration district number:0001
family number:124
sheet number and letter:5A
line number:50
nara publication:T626, roll 2326
film number:2342060
digital folder number:4547949
image number:00080
HouseholdGenderAgeBirthplace
headS Ross TudorM39Texas
wifeBergie M TudorF30Texas
sonLenord D TudorM11Texas
sonRaymond H TudorM7Texas
daughterMarge C TudorF3Texas
sonDonald W TudorM2Texas

Family links:
Parents:
Thomas Benton Tudor (1842 – 1917)
Sallie Hampton Keith Tudor (1845 – 1924)

Spouse:
Bergie Mae Mobley Tudor (1899 – 1941)

Children:
Raymond Horton Tudor (1922 – 2001)
Corinne Mae Tudor Williams (1926 – 1992)
Donald Wayne Tudor (1927 – 2012)

Burial:
West End Cemetery
Stephenville
Erath County
Texas, USA
 
Maintained by: TEXAS TUDORS
Originally Created by: Ken Jones
Record added: Jul 29, 2006
Find A Grave Memorial# 15078889

Merry CHRISTmas To All From Our House To Yours


Merry CHRISTmas To All From Our House To YoursEnglish~Merry ChristmasCHRISTMAS SNOW SCENEOld-English-Santa-Claus-Traditional-Christmas-Caroler-Byers

Most families have a Christmas Tree (or maybe even two!) in their house for Christmas. The decorating of the tree is usually a family occasion, with everyone helping. Christmas Trees were first popularized the UK by Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria. Prince Albert was German, and thought that it would be good to use one of his ways of celebrating Christmas in to England.

Holly, Ivy and Mistletoe are also sometimes used to decorate homes or other buildings.

Like a lot of countries, Nativity Plays and Carol Services are also very popular at Christmas time. Some of the Church’s in England have a Carols by Candlelight Service where the church is only lit up by candles. It is a very special service. Lots of British churches also have Christingle services.

Children believe that Father Christmas or Santa Claus leaves presents in stockings or pillow-cases. These are normally hung up by the fire or by the children’s beds on Christmas Eve. Children sometimes leave out mince pies and brandy for Father Christmas to eat and drink when he visits them. 

Children write letters to Father Christmas listing their requests, but sometimes instead of putting them in the post, the letters are tossed into the fireplace. The draft carries the letters up the chimney and Father Christmas reads the smoke.

In England it is sometimes said that a stranger coming through the door carrying a lump of coal will bring good luck.

The main Christmas Meal is usually eaten at lunchtime or early afternoon on Christmas Day. It was traditionally roast beef or goose, roast vegetables and ‘all the trimmings’ which means stuffing and sometimes bacon and sausages. Dessert is often Christmas Pudding. Mince meat pies and lots of chocolates are often eaten as well! The dinner table is decorated with a Christmas Cracker for each person and sometimes flowers and candles.

The first-ever Christmas card was posted in England in the 1840’s, and the practice soon became an established part of the build-up to Christmas. Over a billion Christmas cards are now sent every year in the United Kingdom, many of them sold in aid of charities.

Christmas decorations in general have even earlier origins.

Holly, ivy and mistletoe are associated with rituals going back beyond the Dark Ages. (The custom of kissing beneath a sprig of mistletoe is derived from an ancient pagan tradition.)

The Christmas tree was introduced into the royal household by Queen Charlotte, wife of King George III, and popularized by Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria, in the 1840’s.

Charles Dickens’s short novel A Christmas Carol has prompted people the world over to associate Christmas with Victorian England. Originally published on 17 December 1843, the book was rapturously reviewed and became an instant success, the first 6,000 copies of its initial print-run being sold out by Christmas. Theatrical, television and movie adaptations of the book continue to be as popular in Britain as they are in the United States.

Leroy & Jean (Linderman) Frederick Family, Jacinto City, Harris, Texas


Leroy Eugene Frederick and Jean Marie (Linderman) Frederick bought a new home at 1709 Cheston Drive, Jacinto City, TX in 1948. They had six children together, Joseph, Phyllis, Sally, Karl, Patricia, and Sarah Frederick. They resided there from 1948 to 1968.

History

Jacinto City’s history dates back to Nov. 1, 1841, when the State of Texas issued a land grant to James Wyatt Oates. In 1866, his grandson, Charles Oates, built the first home in what is now Jacinto City. Whittier Elementary School currently sits on that site. At that time, ranching and logging were the predominant industries in the area. Once the Houston Ship Channel was developed and oil refining took root in the area, things started to grow rapidly. In 1917 a little dirt road called Market Street was covered with shell. In the 1920’s Holland Avenue was extended to go from Clinton Drive to Market Street. Our status as a rural community changed around 1942 when Frank Sharp began to develop the first subdivision then known as Industrial Acres. Soon after, a commercial hub appeared which included a theater, grocery store and later a post office. In 1946 a group of citizens banded together to form a General Law City which was incorporated in May of 1946.